Are you and your cows ready for the summer heat?

David Balbian, Area Dairy Specialist
Central New York Dairy and Field Crops

April 30, 2014

Are You and Your Cows Ready for the Summer Heat?

Summer arrives every year in June and our dairy cattle are always negatively affected by the summer heat and humidity. We have had some warmer weather already, but nothing like we will experience during the midst of summer. Measures to take include:

1) Work with your nutritionist now to develop a plan to modify the diet to account for lower dry matter intake. This may mean increasing the nutrient density of the diet. However, be careful to maintain enough effective fiber in the diet. Consider increasing potassium, sodium, and magnesium levels in the diet, as these minerals can be depleted during excessive heat.

2) Water availability is increasingly important. Double check all your equipment.

3) Air movement: depending on your barn you may use circulating fans or tunnel ventilation. Be sure the system has adequate capacity and is properly designed. Sidewall curtains and ridge vent openings in free stall barns help facilitate air exchange. Call if you need assistance.

4) Shade becomes very valuable. If you are grazing and no shade is available in the pasture it may be beneficial to bring cows in during the hottest times of the day, assuming you have good air movement via fans or tunnel ventilation. Be sure to provide some extra forage in the barn.

5) Sprinklers (in conjunction with fans) can really be beneficial in free stall barns. You need an adequate water supply and you need to be able to handle the extra water added to your manure system. Misters and high pressure foggers have sometimes been used to provide an evaporative cooling effect in the south, but only a small number exist in New York State.




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Upcoming Events

Manure Management & CAFO Permit Workshop - Waterville

December 6, 2022
Waterville, NY

Lunch included.  CCA Credits available.  This event will count as a DEC approved manure applicator training for CAFO permitees.

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Manure Management & CAFO Permit Workshop - Ballston Spa

December 8, 2022
Ballston Spa, NY

Lunch included.  CCA Credits available.  This event will count as a DEC approved manure applicator training for CAFO permitees.

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Artificial Insemination Training Course

December 12 - December 13, 2022
Little Falls, NY

Two day course.  Lunch included.  The course will have classroom and practical components.  Registration limited to 12 people.

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Announcements

Spotted Lanternfly

Lycorma delicatula, or Spotted Lanternfly (SLF), is an invasive plant hopper from Asia and is an agricultural pest. In the United States, it was first found in Pennsylvania in 2014. Spotted Lanternfly has been found in New York State on Staten Island, all New York City boroughs, Long Island, Port Jervis, Sloatsburg, Orangeburg, Ithaca, Binghamton, Middletown, Newburgh, Highland, and the Buffalo area. SLF threatens the agriculture and forestry industries, and is also a nuisance pest. The nymphs and adults feed on over 70 different plants, but is especially detrimental to grapes, a black walnut, hops, maple trees and apples. New York State Ag and Markets supported CCE efforts to help bring awareness to communities and we developed this Public Service Announcement and would appreciate you sharing it with your member lists. 



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