Forage Sampling and Varying Results

David Balbian, Area Dairy Specialist
Central New York Dairy and Field Crops

April 30, 2014

This was a topic recently discussed by Dr. Bill Weiss, from The Ohio State University. Work they recently conducted showed that sampling error can vary widely between feeds and between farms. Work they did in Ohio, using a very strict set of protocols for the sampling process, showed more variation in results than most nutritionists (and producers) would like to see.

Variation in dry matter is something that can be tested on-farm with a Koster Moisture Tester, microwave, or other method. As fed weights (when feeding by weight with TMR feeding systems) can easily be adjusted to account for those changes. But, what do you do when the actual nutrient content changes? Do you have your nutritionist adjust your ration every week? That answer really depends on whether or not your forages did actually change or was the variation a result of sampling error?

Actual change is often easily recognized by producers because they know feed came from a different field or was a different variety. How the feed is stored can impact changes at feed out. Feed differences in upright silos and especially Ag. bags will be more apparent than with bunker silos, where differences between fields are often masked because the feed is blended or layered when filling occurred.

So, is this something you should be concerned with? When feed obviously changes it should be resampled. How about when the feed is all the same? Based on the work in Ohio it seems like a good practice to follow (to be sure your results are accurate) is to sample two times a week for two weeks and then average the results. A bit extreme? Maybe, but take a few samples of the same feed in a short period of time and see what you get.




Dairy

Dairy

Livestock

Livestock

Forages

Forages

Grains

Grains

Upcoming Events

Manure Management & CAFO Permit Workshop - Waterville

December 6, 2022
Waterville, NY

Lunch included.  CCA Credits available.  This event will count as a DEC approved manure applicator training for CAFO permitees.

view details

Manure Management & CAFO Permit Workshop - Ballston Spa

December 8, 2022
Ballston Spa, NY

Lunch included.  CCA Credits available.  This event will count as a DEC approved manure applicator training for CAFO permitees.

view details

Artificial Insemination Training Course

December 12 - December 13, 2022
Little Falls, NY

Two day course.  Lunch included.  The course will have classroom and practical components.  Registration limited to 12 people.

view details

Announcements

Spotted Lanternfly

Lycorma delicatula, or Spotted Lanternfly (SLF), is an invasive plant hopper from Asia and is an agricultural pest. In the United States, it was first found in Pennsylvania in 2014. Spotted Lanternfly has been found in New York State on Staten Island, all New York City boroughs, Long Island, Port Jervis, Sloatsburg, Orangeburg, Ithaca, Binghamton, Middletown, Newburgh, Highland, and the Buffalo area. SLF threatens the agriculture and forestry industries, and is also a nuisance pest. The nymphs and adults feed on over 70 different plants, but is especially detrimental to grapes, a black walnut, hops, maple trees and apples. New York State Ag and Markets supported CCE efforts to help bring awareness to communities and we developed this Public Service Announcement and would appreciate you sharing it with your member lists. 



Sign Up for Our Weekly E-Newsletter

We send out a bi-weekly e-newsletter that has announcements, upcoming programs, and opportunities for you!  Registration is quick, easy, and free.  Click here to sign up today!

CCE Livestock Program Work Team

See the Livestock Program Work Team website for news, upcoming programs, and NYS Slaughterhouse Map.

NEWSLETTER   |   CURRENT PROJECTS   |   IMPACT IN NY   |   SPONSORSHIP  |  RESOURCES   |   SITE MAP