Interim Guidance for Animal Care Operations

Ashley McFarland, Area Livestock Specialist
Central New York Dairy and Field Crops

March 25, 2020

This guidance is provided for animal agriculture workers to include those employed in veterinary health; manufacturing and distribution of animal medical materials and supplies, animal vaccines, animal drugs, feed, and bedding, etc.; raising of animals; animal production operations; transportation of live animals, animal medical supplies; transportation of deceased animals for disposal; livestock markets, including live bird markets, slaughter and packing plants. It also includes equine operations and companion animal/pet stores and shelters; veterinary services for equine, companion animal and other businesses considered essential; and related support/service operations.


Background:

In December 2019, a new respiratory disease called Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) was detected in China. COVID-19 is caused by a virus (SARS-CoV-2) that is part of a large family of viruses called coronaviruses.
On March 20, 2020, Governor Cuomo signed the PAUSE" Executive Order, a 10-point policy to assure uniform safety for everyone. It includes a new directive that all non-essential businesses statewide must close in-office personnel functions effective at 8PM on Sunday, March 22. Essential businesses are exempt from this guidance. Animal care operations, as defined below, have been deemed essential and are exempt.
Animal Care Operations:
For purposes of Executive Order 202.6, animal care operations are defined as the following businesses/activities: 

Livestock/Equine/Captive Cervids

• Feeding • Barn or facility maintenance, stall cleaning and enclosure repair • Turnout and exercise • Essential hoof maintenance and veterinary care • Transportation necessary to meet any of the above functions • Agribusiness that supports any of the above functions

Companion Animals

• Care and feeding of companion animals in shelters, kennels, rescues, operations and pet stores • Pet food manufacturers, distributors, and retailers • Essential veterinary care, including spay/neuter, treatment for infectious disease • Animal shelters receiving seized, lost or abandoned animals • Adoption of animals from within New York State • Pet boarding facilities • Service dog training and care

If a business does not fall within this guidance, but you believe that it is essential or it is an entity providing essential services or functions, you may request designation as an essential business. To request designation as an essential business, please click here.

Animal Care/Boarding Facilities:
If you have an animal at a privately-owned facility, terms regarding client use and visitation rests with that business owner. Social distancing must be adhered to.
For equine: It is permissible to have horse owners as the primary providers of daily care for their own horses at boarding facilities, however business owners and horse owners must collaborate to minimize the number of people in the stable and to adhere to social distancing.
*There is no evidence that animals, including pets, in the United States might be a source of infection/can spread this new coronavirus. To date, CDC has not received any reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19.

FOR EMPLOYEES

Cleaning/Disinfecting and Social Distancing:

All privately-owned facilities must practice social distancing, and proper cleaning and sanitizing of the facility. This includes:

  • • Regular hand washing with soap and water for at least 20 seconds should be done:
  • • Before and after eating.
  • • After sneezing, coughing, or nose blowing.
  • • After touching face, hair, cellphone and/or clothing.
  • • After using the restroom.
  • • Before handling food.
  • • After touching or cleaning surfaces that may be contaminated.
  • • After using shared equipment and supplies.
  • • Cover coughs and sneezes with tissues or the corner of elbow.
  • • Dispose of soiled tissues immediately after use.

It is encouraged to post signage with hand washing procedures in prominent locations. Clean and disinfect buildings and equipment as outlined in this guidance.

For additional information, visit the links below:

NYS Department of Agriculture and MarketsNYS Department of HealthCDC COVID Guidance for AnimalsCDC COVID FAQ for AnimalsCDC COVID Guidance for Pet Owners if in Isolation

PRO-DAIRY e-Alert MARCH 23, 2020
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Diversity and Inclusion are part of Cornell's heritage. We are a recognized employer and educator valuing AA/EEO, Protected Veterans and Individuals with Disabilities. ________________________________________
For more information about PRO-DAIRY, go to: http://prodairy.cals.cornell.edu/
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Two-Day Course.  English / Spanish program. Lunch included.

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Announcements

Cash Rent and Custom Harvest Survey

To date, there is limited information available about rental rates and fees for crop harvesting.  Farms can use this valuable information for their farm business planning to help improve decision making and profitability. 

The data that is collected, and the subsequent reports/findings/resources will be helpful for all of us to answer that call of "What's the average rental rate in my area?" and "How much do people charge to combine oats?"

Take the survey here.


Farmers Can Join MeatSuite For Free!

MeatSuite.com is a free resource provided by Cornell University where NY meat farmers can create a farm profile and list their bulk (wholes, halves, quarters) and bundled (i.e. Grilling Bundle) meat products.

Why should farmers join?

1. It's free and easy!
2. Connect with more local customers. In the past year the MeatSuite.com farm directory had 8,300 visits from New York consumers. Farm profiles get as many as 25 views per month from potential local customers. We also spotlight MeatSuite farms on social media and bring attention and purchases to farms through highlights and giveaways.

How do I join?

Farmers can visit https://www.meatsuite.com/farmers/ to create a free farm profile. You must list at least one product for your farm's profile to go live. You'll also have access to Cornell's free Meat Price Calculator, a helpful tool for pricing your meat to make a profit.

While you're on MeatSuite, check out the "Creating Consumer-Friendly Bulk Meats" publication on the log-in page. It has tips on how to create bulk meat products that are easier for first-time buyers to say "yes" to.

If you have any questions as you create your farm profile or products, we're here to help! Please email Matt LeRoux at mnl28@cornell.edu.


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Spotted Lanternfly

Lycorma delicatula, or Spotted Lanternfly (SLF), is an invasive plant hopper from Asia and is an agricultural pest. In the United States, it was first found in Pennsylvania in 2014. Spotted Lanternfly has been found in New York State on Staten Island, all New York City boroughs, Long Island, Port Jervis, Sloatsburg, Orangeburg, Ithaca, Binghamton, Middletown, Newburgh, Highland, and the Buffalo area. SLF threatens the agriculture and forestry industries, and is also a nuisance pest. The nymphs and adults feed on over 70 different plants, but is especially detrimental to grapes, a black walnut, hops, maple trees and apples. New York State Ag and Markets supported CCE efforts to help bring awareness to communities and we developed this Public Service Announcement and would appreciate you sharing it with your member lists. 



CCE Livestock Program Work Team

See the Livestock Program Work Team website for news, upcoming programs, and NYS Slaughterhouse Map.

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